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NSN seed logoIf data is available, this is where you find Ecoregion Descriptions, Plant Communities of that ecoregion, and Species Lists/Recommendations for both.  If you know the community types at your project site, use community recommendations as the species will be more appropriate and more specifically geared to your site.  
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Mojave Basin and Range Ecoregion

This ecoregion contains scattered mountains which are generally lower than those of the Central Basin and Range. Potential natural vegetation in this region is predominantly creosote bush, as compared to the mostly saltbush-greasewood and Great Basin sagebrush of the ecoregion to the north, and creosote bush-bur sage with large patches of palo verde-cactus shrub and saguaro cactus in the Sonoran Basin and Range to the south. Most of this region is federally owned and there is relatively little grazing activity because of the lack of water and forage for livestock. Heavy use of off-road vehicles and motorcycles in some areas has caused severe wind and water erosion problems.

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Mojave Basin and Range Plant Communities

Alkali Sink

Poorly drained flats and playas in which high rates of evaporation produce high salt concentrations in the soil. Characterized by low scattered halophytes, usually featuring the genus Atriplex.
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Aspen-conifer

In the Intermountain area, there are over 20 million acres (8.1 million ha) of aspen scattered from upper foothill ranges to mountaintops and high plateaus. The majority of the aspen occurs at middle elevations and span a broad range of environmental conditions. Annual precipitation within the Intermountain aspen zone ranges from 16 to 40 inches (400 to 1,000 mm). Aspen can be found growing in association with tall forbs, ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, spruce-fir, mountain brush, open parks of mountain big sagebrush, snowberry and chokecherry, and on the margin of grasslands. Aspen trees are found along moist streams as well as on dry ridges and southerly exposures, on talus slopes, and in deep to shallow soils of various origins.
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Basin big sagebrush

Within the Intermountain West, basin big sagebrush can be found from 3,000 to 7,000 ft (914 to 2,140 m) elevation, with annual precipitation ranging from 9 to 16 inches (23 to 41 cm). A majority of the irrigated farmlands, dry farms, and dryland pastures within the Intermountain West were once dominated by basin big sagebrush.
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Black greasewood

Black greasewood occupies considerable acreages on salty valley bottoms. This plant also occurs on salt-bearing shale outcrops in canyons and on foothills. Sites vary in respect to soil texture and availability of ground water. Some areas are wet with high water tables, and others are dry with welldrained soils. Black greasewood occurs in pure or mixed stands. Livestock can safely consume moderate amounts of greasewood when it is eaten in conjunction with other forage. Black greasewood is not known to be poisonous to game animals and, in fact, has some forage value.
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Creosote Bush Scrub

Well-drained soil of slopes, fans, and valleys, usually below 3500 feet, in deserts from Owens Valley to Mexico. Characterized by widely spaced shrubs 2 to 10 feet tall, dominated by Creosote bush.
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Inland saltgrass

Inland saltgrass has gained control on many dry to semiwet meadows in upland and lowland areas where alkalinity is appreciable and where the early growing grasses, sedges, forbs, and shrubs have been depleted by grazing. Soils are generally heavy with high water tables at least during some period of the year. Some areas may have standing or running water for short periods. While these meadows are relatively small, they usually have a much higher potential for livestock forage production and as wildlife habitat than when dominated by saltgrass. Improvements may benefit wildlife and allow for grazing at different and longer seasons, but revegetation projects should be carefully evaluated before treatments begin.
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Joshua Tree Woodland

Well drained mesas and slopes 2500 to 4000 feet or higher, from southern Owens Valley to Little San Bernardino Mountains and southern Nevada and Utah.
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Pinyon-Juniper Woodland

From the East base of the Sierra Nevada and White-Inyo ranges southward through the higher mountains of the Mojave, mostly at elevations of 5000 to 8000 feet.
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Shadscale Scrub

Heavy soils, often with underlying hardpan, of mesas and flats from 3000 to 6000 feet elevation. Shallow-rooted vegetation, mostly 1 to 2 feet tall, and covering large monotonous areas between Creosote Bush Scrub and Joshua Tree Woodland.
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