This is a robot catcher. Don't click this or your ip address will be banned. It should be hidden from you.
NSN Logo Home Page
NSN seed logoIf data is available, this is where you find Ecoregion Descriptions, Plant Communities of that ecoregion, and Species Lists/Recommendations for both.  If you know the community types at your project site, use community recommendations as the species will be more appropriate and more specifically geared to your site.  
If species recommendations are not available for your project area, try searching seed for sale in your ecoregion.

Where does NSN get species lists and recommendations?

 

Willamette Valley Ecoregion

Rolling prairies, deciduous/coniferous forests, and extensive wetlands characterized the pre-19th century landscape of this broad, lowland valley. The Willamette Valley is distinguished from the adjacent Coast Range (1) and Cascades (4) by lower precipitation, less relief, and a different mosaic of vegetation. Landforms consist of terraces and floodplains that are interlaced and surrounded by rolling hills. Productive soils and a temperate climate make it one of the most important agricultural areas in Oregon.
Get Species Recommendations

Willamette Valley Plant Communities

Herbaceous Balds and Bluffs

Herbaceous balds and bluffs occur in the driest environmental settings within the ecoregion that support continuous vegetation: generally south- to west-facing slopes on shallow or sandy/gravelly soils. They are most numerous in the driest climatic portion of the ecoregion in the Gulf Islands, San Juan Islands, and southeastern Vancouver Island. They typically occur as isolated sites within a forest matrix or on coastal bluffs. Fire was probably an important process historically on most of these sites, and some of them are threatened by invasion of trees in the absence of disturbance. Vegetation is dominated by perennial bunchgrasses, forbs, and mosses. Scattered trees, especially Pseudotsuga menziesii, are often present.
Get Species List   

Oregon White Oak Woodlands

This system is associated with dry sites and/or frequent pre-settlement fires. In the Willamette Valley, soils are mesic yet well-drained. In the Puget Lowland and Georgia Basin, this system is only found on dry sites, typically either shallow bedrock soils or deep gravelly glacial outwash soils. Even where more environmentally-limited, the system is strongly associated with a pre-European settlement low-severity fire regime. Succession in the absence of fire tends to favor increased shrub dominance in the understory, increased tree density, and increased importance of conifers, with the end result being conversion to a conifer forest. The vegetation is a woodland or forest dominated by deciduous broadleaf trees, mostly Quercus garryana. Co-dominance by the evergreen conifer Pseudotsuga menziesii is common. This system is borderline between small patch and large patch in its dynamics.
Get Species List   

Upland Prairies and Savannas

This ecosystem formed a complex mosaic of varying patch sizes with wet prairies and riparian forests over much of the Willamette Valley during the pre-European settlement era. In parts of the Puget Trough, it occurred as large patches in more forested landscapes, usually associated with deep, coarse outwash deposits. It occurs on well-drained soils and was maintained historically by frequent anthropogenic burning. In the absence of disturbance, many of them have succeeded to forest and others continue to do so. Dominant vegetation is perennial bunchgrasses, especially Festuca roemeri, and to a lesser degree, Danthonia californica, with abundant and diverse forbs. Scattered deciduous (Quercus garryana) and/or conifer (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Pinus ponderosa) trees are rarely found now, but such savannas historically covered about 1/3 of the total acreage.
Get Species Recommendations

Vernal Pools

Vernal pools are rare in the ecoregion being restricted to the Willamette Valley, Gulf Islands and San Juan Islands. They are characterized by freshwater inundation for much of the winter and spring, followed by dramatic lowering of the water table at the approach of summer, such that soils are dry in the summer. They are found in isolated small depressions with no inflow or outflow and a restrictive subsurface soil layer (clay or bedrock). Vegetation is dominated primarily by annual forbs.
Get Species List   

Wet Prairies

Wet prairies historically covered large areas of the Willamette Valley where they were maintained by a combination of wetland soil hydrology and frequent burning. These are high nutrient wetlands that are temporarily to seasonally flooded. They have been reduced to tiny fragments of their former extent. They are dominated primarily by graminoids, especially Deschampsia cespitosa and Carex spp., and to a lesser degree by forbs or shrubs.
Get Species Recommendations

 

 

Help us build species recommendations for this ecoregion.  Contact NSN 

This is a robot catcher. Don't click this or your ip address will be banned. It should be hidden from you.