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NSN seed logoIf data is available, this is where you find Ecoregion Descriptions, Plant Communities of that ecoregion, and Species Lists/Recommendations for both.  If you know the community types at your project site, use community recommendations as the species will be more appropriate and more specifically geared to your site.  
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Sierra Nevada Ecoregion

The Sierra Nevada is a deeply dissected block fault that rises sharply from the arid basin and range ecoregions on the east and slopes gently toward the Central California Valley to the west. The eastern portion has been strongly glaciated and generally contains higher mountains than are found in the Klamath Mountains to the northwest. Much of the central and southern parts of the region is underlain by granite as compared to the mostly sedimentary formations of the Klamath Mountains and volcanic rocks of the Cascades. The higher elevations of this region are largely federally owned and include several national parks. The vegetation grades from mostly ponderosa pine at the lower elevations on the west side and lodgepole pine on the east side, to fir and spruce at the higher elevations. Alpine conditions exist at the highest elevations.

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Sierra Nevada Plant Communities

Alpine Fell-fields

Almost entirely perennial herbs, scattered or forming low turf, or among rocks; many cushion plants. Heavy accumulations of snow, where not swept away by gales, often persisting well into the summer.
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Chaparral

Dry slopes and ridges below the Yellow Pine Forest. Diverse hard-leaved, often evergreen, shrubs typically growing together to create impenetrable coverage. Fire-prone, with many shrubs sprouting from the stumps.
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Foothill Woodland

Foothills and valley borders, 400 to 3000 feet. Trees 15 to 70 feet tall, in dense or open woodland, with scattered brush and grassland between the trees, which include Pinus sabiniana, several species of oak, California bay laurel, and California buckeye.
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Lodgepole Forest

Dense to open forest often with extensive meadows scattered throughout, growing from about 8000 to 9500 feet. In addition to lodgepole pines, hemlocks may be found.
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Red Fir Forest

Dense forest in a heavy snow accumulation zone, from 6000 to 9000 feet. Often dominated by monotypic stands of red fir; integrades with mixed-conifer below, including yellow pine and white fir; gives way to lodgepole pine at higher elevations.
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Subalpine Forest

The most boreal forest in California is dominated by various five-needles pines, perhaps most abundantly Pinus albicaulis. Krummholz forms appear on upper slopes, ridges, and passes. Growing season lasts 7 to 9 weeks, with killing frost and snow possible throughout the year.
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Yellow Pine Forest

Mid-elevation forest between the foothill pine communities and red fir zone. Yellow pines are prevalent, but many other large trees contribute to a mixed-conifer forest, including white fir, incense cedar, and sugar pine. Openings dominated by Arctostaphylos, Ceanothus, and to a lesser extent, Ribes.
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